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Archives for August 2013

Quick Tip for Freelance Writing Success

Written by Yuwanda Black

Here’s your Quick Tip for Freelance Writing Success for this week . . .

Learn How to Use Your Time More Wisely

With the busy season almost upon us, figuring out how to maximize your time will not only increase your earnings, it’ll make your work days go much more smoothly. One of the things I do to is time block my days, as I wrote about in a guest post on Jennifer Brown Banks’ freelance writing blog, Pen and Prosper

One of the Things I Do to Increase My Productivity as a Freelance Business Owner

Explaining why I timeblock my days, in the above-mentioned post, I wrote:

I time-block my days down to the hour. This way, if I’m tempted to spend too much time surfing or am just having one of those off days where I can’t decide what to work on, all I have to do is look at my calendar to see exactly what I should be doing at that hour.

Remember, your daily calendar is simply a breakdown of the lifetime hopes and dreams you want to achieve – chopped up into daily increments. If you goof off today, what dreams are you NOT achieving tomorrow?

One of the Things I’m Learning as I Become More Successful

We’ve all heard the phrase “time is money.” Sometimes, I think when we hear little idiomatic expressions like this, they don’t sink in because they’re so common. But let me tell ya, one of the things I’m learning as my freelance business grows — and as I get older — is that how I use my time is DIRECTLY tied to my income.

It’s no longer some little expression that I hear and dismiss; it’s my living, breathing reality. For example, one of my income streams is self-publishing ebooks. For each one I publish, I’ve started to put an annual dollar amount I strive to earn from it (it’s very nominal). To achieve the income goal I’ve set for myself in three years (I almost always plan things two to three years out), I have to produce every day, week and month.

If I don’t, I’ll be able to look back and see what I didn’t do that’s cost me.

Time Can Make You a Millionaire! An Eye-Popping Truth

Another thing I like to do to stay motivated is play around with numbers — as in projected income. Did you know that if you started saving just $100 per month at 20 years old, by the time you’re ready for retirement (65), you’d have well over $1 million ($1,048,338.53 to be exact). How/why? Compound interest is the simple answer. When I see this it just makes me sick because, of course, I didn’t start saving for retirement that young!

You don’t have to learn any fancy investment strategies, ever have a high-paying job, or play catch up in your 40s and 50s. If you just start putting a measly $100 bucks per month away at 20, you’ll be a millionaire when you retire. Can’t get more easy or straightforward than that.

How did I arrive at the above number? By using this simple savings calculator, I plugged in the following (click graphic for larger view).

Productivity Tip for Freelance WritersThe reason I used 10% interest is because the stock market has returned on average of 10% per year since its inception. It’s actually a bit higher than this, but that’s usually the figure you hear thrown around when it’s talked about, so it’s a good gauge.

The reason I used this as an example of how important it is to maximize your time as a freelance writer is that what you do with your time is like compounding interest.

How you use time are the rewards (or not) that you’ll reap in the future; or as I said in the piece on Jennifer’s blog, if you misuse your time today, what dreams are you NOT achieving tomorrow?

So figure out one or two ways where you can better maximize your time. Is it:

Hiring a VA to handle your social media marketing (something I’m looking into)?

Batch writing a week’s worth of blog posts?

Getting up an hour earlier to get your marketing out of the way?

Growing your freelance business by outsourcing jobs?

Putting in a few hours on the weekend to get all admin tasks out of the way?

Start dieting/exercising so you can have more energy during the day?

Maximizing your time as a freelancer is an investment in your future you won’t regret; one that will pay great dividends. And the sooner you get on it, the sooner that ‘compound interest’ (career rewards) can start to kick in!

Share Your Thoughts

Please share some of your time-saving tips in the comments section below.

Have a Quick Tip for Freelance Writing Success?

Send it in. Following are the submission guidelines.

Submission Guidelines

Length: 100-250 Words

Bio: 25-50 words; a link to your freelance writing website/blog and a link to one of your social media profiles.

How to Submit: Send in the body of an email (info*at*InkwellEditorial*dot*com). Put “Freelance Quick Tip” in Subject Line. You’ll be sent a link when/if it’s published.

Can you believe it’s Friday already! This week flew by. 🙂

LABOR DAY EBOOK & E-CLASS DISCOUNTS

Note: Sale ends Monday, September 2nd at midnight (U.S. EST).

Get an Ebook for Half Price: Right now if you buy any individual ebook (not an ebook package), you get a second one of your choosing for half off. Note: The “half off” ebook must be priced equal to or LESS than your highest-priced item. For example, if you buy an ebook for $19.95, you get half off a second one priced at $19.95 or less.

50% Off Freelance Writing Ecourse: The general freelance writing e-course. Learn how to earn $30,000 to $50,000 pretty seamlessly as a freelance writer.

How to Take Advantage of This Sale: Make your selections, figure the total, then send payment to payment@InkwellEditorial.com. DO NOT purchase via the payment buttons on the site. Tell us in the comments section of your PayPal payment which ebooks you want. All ebooks will be delivered manually within 24 hours (yes, even this holiday weekend).

An SEO Copywriting Training GuideP.S.: How to Write SEO Copy That Sells: Search engine algorithm changes like Penguin 2.0 have made it harder than ever to rank well. Learning how to write SEO content (and where to most effectively distribute it) is a blog marketing basic. You can use the techniques you learn to promote everything from client websites to your own products and services.

This training manual holds nothing back — you’ll learn practically every trick in the book about how to write (and distribute!) SEO content to get more website/blog traffic.

P.P.S.: Did you know that you can order any of our products (like the SEO copywriting course) and take up to 6 months to pay? You can — really!

 

Read more.

Online Writing Jobs: 10+ Unusual Ways To Make Easy Money On The Internet If You Love Writing

Written by Yuwanda Black

I finally got active on StumbleUpon again last week, thanks to Karen’s post on getting your freelance business blog/site to rank better with ‘the Big G” (Google, in case you don’t know). I hadn’t logged into my account there since 2008! Anyhoo, as I was stumbling around the site (pun fully intended), I ran across an interesting post on some unusual ways to make money writing on the web.

Earn $1,500 Per Month Writing Domain Names — “Say What!

Some of these are old hat (eg, writing reviews), but some others I thought were kind of unique, eg, making up to $1,500 per month to write domain names. Huh! Yeah, it’s true! The author of the post referenced above explains how, writing:

The original idea comes from Dane Carson’s blog. While you can earn money as a contributor for services such as PickyDomains.Com, here is a better idea. Go to Google or any other search engine, find sucky domain names and contact their owners directly, offering them your services.

The key to success is to make it 100% risk free. Inform your prospective clients that you’ll accept money only if they like your domain name. If you come up with one approved domain name a day and charge what PickyDomain charges, you can make $1500 a month. (emphasis added)

Talk about variety in the opportunities to be found in freelance writing?! I’d never heard of this type of online writing job. Have you?

Check out the full post on unusual ways to make money online as a writerYou just may pick up a gig or two!

Finding it Hard to Land Freelance Writing Gigs Nowadays?

FYI, if the last few weeks have been kinda slow, don’t fret. We’re in the waning days of summer and Labor Day is upon us. When a major U.S. holiday is coming up, things are always slower.

One Freelance Writer's Marketing Success Story

Summer is also one of the slowest times for many freelance writers (although I hear from plenty all the time who are super busy! — check out this post on Inkwell’s Facebook page to see what I mean).

After Labor Day is the official start of the busy fall season. So enjoy these last few days before you have to be in full swing again, ok.

Note: Be sure to Like us while you’re over there on Facebook — and ask questions, share your freelance experiences, etc., ok? 🙂

Coming Tomorrow on Inkwell Editorial Companion Site SeoWritingJobs.com

A look at putting your SEO writing clients on retainer. Even though my SEO writing company still accepts “one off” jobs, the way our pricing it set up, it kinda pushes this option.

Fellow SEO writer Jean gave me the idea for this post when she commented on regular contributor’s Chrislyn’s post last week, writing:

Offer clients recurring/retainer-like packages. They may not want them, but enough will. As time goes on, bingo! Recurring monthly income (so sweet)!

Subscribe to the newsletter (see subscription box on the right-hand side of every page); so you don’t miss it!

See ya on SeoWritingJobs.com tomorrow.
Yuwanda
Legitimate Work from Home Job Opportunity

P.S.: Start Your Freelance Writing Career Today!

We offer two online freelance writing classes to get you started. So whether you want to (I) specialize in SEO writing; or (II) just want to know how to become a freelance writer — period — we can help.

P.P.S.: You can now order any of our products (like the SEO writing e-course) and take up to 6 months to pay — really!

 

Read more.

Calling All Freelance Writers: Have You Applied to Any Full-time Jobs Lately? Here are 5 Reasons You Should

I wrote a post a few years ago for FreelanceWritingGigs.com about why freelance writers should apply to full-time jobs. The post didn’t survive the sale of the site a few years ago (don’t know why), so I thought I’d cover it here because it really is a good way to land FREELANCE gigs. Following is why.

Before we delve into it, I just want to remind new readers that I’ve been in the editorial industry since 1987. I started out working for a legal trade publisher in New York City. I worked at this company off and on for a decade.

From 1996 to 2004, I owned/operated Inkwell Editorial, which was an editorial outsource / staffing agency in the city.

We staffed all types of editorial positions – from copy editors to graphic designers. I’ve spoken with the hiring directors, managers and department heads of some of the largest and smallest companies; and interviewed, hired and fired a few hundred editorial professionals.

I point all this out to underscore that I’ve been on both sides of the editorial hiring desk. So, what I’m about to tell you comes from first-hand experience.

The Editorial Hiring Process

Companies seek to fill new positions for a variety of reasons, eg, they’ve grown, someone is fired or quits, and/or a department or the company itself is contracting (which often happens when a firm is bought/sold). No matter the reason, when they’re looking fill a position, they forward that request to the person/department in charge of finding a new hire.

But what’s happening while all of this is going on? Work, right? As in, the job that the new person is going to do still has to get done. This brings me to the first reason to apply to full-time jobs, ie . . .GGet Freelance Writing Jobs by Applying to Full-time Job Listings

5 Reasons Freelance Writers Should Apply to Full-time Jobs

1) The Work Still Has to Get Done: Rarely is a new hire going to take on a new role that hasn’t been implemented. Most companies just don’t work this way.

What usually happens is that the job has been abandoned (someone is fired, quits, goes on maternity leave, etc.). In the meantime, deadlines must still be met and projects must still be completed. And until the perfect new hire is in place, your freelance application may hit the right desk at the right time to land the gig.

And speaking of the perfect employee . . .

2) The “Perfect Employee”: Let me let you in on a little secret — one thing I learned in my years as a recruiter is that when a company puts together a job description on what they want, this person usually doesn’t exist.

Like looking for the perfect house or apartment when you’re on a budget – they come to the realization sooner or later that they’re going to have to compromise on something. A good recruiter leads an employer to this conclusion without ever saying so. How/why?

What I did when I was recruiting was ask clients for their Top 3 “must haves.” While many came with a “requirements” list that was anywhere from 5 to 15 (or more) bullet points long, I focused on their top three must haves when I sourced candidates.

Now remember, work is still piling up because the company is one man down. So all of those requirements become less important if the person had their ‘must haves’ – especially the longer the recruiting process went on. And if you’re a freelancer with those must haves who’s applied, then you have a shot at landing the gig until the “perfect employee” is found.

How to Find a Full-Time Job without Actively Looking for One

When I was recruiting and a client would agree to use a freelancer until they could find a full-time employee, many times the freelancer was offered the position because they were such a good fit. This is how some freelancers wind up back in 9 to 5 jobs – which is cool if that’s what you really want. It’s an ideal way to kind of back into a great full-time job without the stress of looking for one.

3) Editorial Cutbacks: When I worked at the legal trade publishing company in NYC, I went through something like six reorgs. Each time, something changed, eg, entire departments were eliminated.

At the firm I worked at, we used to have a QC (quality control) department. I remember when this department and the stand-alone Art department were eliminated. Of course, this meant more work for existing employees.

Sometimes, a scaled-down staff can’t handle the increase in work during peak times. When editorial cutbacks happen, it presents opportunities for freelance writers (and other editorial professionals) to slide in and land gigs, especially during a firm’s busy season.

4) Companies Change: Another thing I learned as a recruiter is that companies change courses all the time. As in, they may decide that a full-time person is not what they want after all. This could be because of budgetary concerns, they revamp a position, new leadership is brought in, the company is bought/sold, etc.

So while you may see a full-time job listed one week, next week that same position could be advertised as a freelance or job-sharing position.

5) Once You’re In, You’re In! Once a firm hires you, you’re likely to become their “go to” company freelancer. This usually happens because once you get your foot in the door with, for example, one editor, they’ll recommend you to other departments. I’ve worked with as many as a half dozen employees in the same company – all by getting in good with one person.

So once you do get in, be sure to not only do a good job, but by asking your contact to refer you to their colleagues.

What to Expect from Employers When You Apply to Full-time Job Listings as a Freelancer

If a company is not interested, they’ll just overlook your job application. This is about the worst thing that will ever happen. So you literally have nothing to lose by applying.

Freelancers Vital to Worldwide Economies

And not for nothing, but freelancing is a concept that many firms embrace. Following are a couple of eye-popping statistics, in my opinion, on just how reliant businesses are on freelancers in two of the world’s largest economies (the U.S. and Great Britain).

In the current economic climate, businesses and freelancers agree that freelancers are essential for helping grow the UK economy. There is an evident understanding from businesses that freelancers are vital to help businesses in the UK operate – indeed 60% say that it would be difficult without freelancers (emphasis added). [Source: Report — National Freelancers Day Research Conducted on behalf of PCG]

Mark Koba, Senior Editor at CNBC, writing on the 2009 U.S. recession noted that “More than 90 percent of US firms use contract [ie, freelance] talent (emphasis added), with spending on them doubling in the past six years, to more than $120 billion. … contract workers are becoming a permanent fixture in the economy that is likely to continue even after the recession is over. . . Companies will staff up at certain levels again, but I think they will use freelancers or consultants on a regular basis going forward.” [Source: CNBC article, Freelance Nation: Slump Spurs Growth of Contract Workers]

As you can see, the need is there.

Conclusion

So scour those full-time job listings and send in your freelance application. You’ll decrease the competition from other freelancers (for sure!) and you just may be the “full-time” option a firm is looking for.

Coming Thursday on Inkwell Editorial Companion Site SeoWritingJobs.com

A look at putting clients on retainer. Even though my SEO writing company still accepts “one off” jobs, the way our pricing it set up, it kinda pushes this option. Fellow SEO writer Jean gave me the idea for this post when she commented on regular contributor’s Chrislyn’s post last week, writing:

Offer clients recurring/retainer-like packages. They may not want them, but enough will. As time goes on, bingo! Recurring monthly income (so sweet)!

Subscribe to the newsletter so you don’t miss it!

Yuwanda
Legitimate Work from Home Job Opportunity

P.S.: Start Your Freelance Writing Career Today!

We offer two online freelance writing classes to get you started. So whether you want to (i) specialize in SEO writing; or (ii) just want to know how to become a freelance writer — period — we can help.

P.P.S.: You can now order any of our products (like the SEO writing e-course) and take up to 6 months to pay — really!

Read more.

Freelance Writing Jobs for the Week of 8/26/2013

Note: Some of these jobs, although freelance, may be location specific. In those cases, the location is listed. FYI, tech and real estate writing/blogging jobs seemed to dominate a lot of the listings I found this week. Good luck applying!

Freelance SEO Health Writer: Seeking experienced SEO writers to research and write 400-word articles on proven home remedies that soothe sore throats. Pay: $45 per article. Get full details on this SEO writing job.

Small Business Bloggers: We are continuing to grow editorial at a major small business blog and are looking for contributors who can regularly provide high-quality, timely, and well-written stories about small business. Specifically, we are looking for regular stories with small business tips; operational advice on marketing, management, and finance; interviews with small business leaders; case studies; etc. Pay: $100 per post (usually in the 400-500 word range). Get full details on this small business blogging job.

Freelance Digital Writers: Publishing company seeking several writers to regularly produce 5,000 to 6,000-word manuscripts with samples and illustrations about digital marketing for lawyers. Pay: 20 cents per word. Get full details on this freelance writing job.

Legal Writers: A legal advice website is looking for writers that are versatile and can write in varying styles for varying audiences. One week you might be writing blog posts (e.g. 10 tips on how to respond after a car accident), and the next week your assignment may be for more informative legal articles (e.g. What the new DOMA means for immigration). The one non-negotiable requirement is that you’re able to turn in assignments within 2 days (i.e. an assignment goes out Monday, you turn in Wednesday by end of day). Pay: $40-$75 per article. Get full details on this legal writing job.

Freelance Academic Writers and Editors (Canada): Tip Top Writers, a small Canadian writing boutique is seeking freelance writers and editors who have a formal academic background (ie. Masters students and upwards). There are two main job positions at Tip Top Writers: Writer and Editor. Work is of an academic nature and you must have extensive academic research and writing experience. Pay: Writers are paid approximately $15.00 CAD per page; a page is considered 250 words for pay purposes. On average a writer earns approximately $30/hour, with more experienced/productive writers earning more. Get full details on this freelance writing/editing job.

Freelance Real Estate / Finance Blogger: Topics pertain to real estate/real estate investing and include writing about things like taxes, financing (mortgages and commercial mortgages), investment returns, and the market and economic outlook for real estate as an asset class.), tips, how-to posts, and interesting and informative lists that readers can easily digest. Pay: Submit your rate. Get full details on this real estate/finance blogging job.

Freelance Comedy Writers (Los Angeles): L.A. based animation production company is looking for comedy writers for our short (1-2 minutes), funny, edgy (South Park, Family Guy etc.), cutting edge animation shorts for internet audience. Pay: $300 per script. There is a potential to be hired as a staff writer with a starting salary of $500/week. Get full details on this comedy writing job.

Freelance News Reporter: Role: Freelance news reporter focusing on sourcing and writing exclusive news on the global property and casualty (P&C) insurance industry. Particular concentration on cyber risk and management liability. Reporter will be expected to source and write 3-5 news articles per day under guidance from editorial head. Rolling monthly contract, up to 3 months. Possible transition to permanent role for right candidate. Start immediately (August 2013). Pay: Not listed. Get full details on this freelance journalism job.

Freelance Real Estate Writer: We’re an international media company, looking for an accomplished senior freelance journalist to write for a new real estate website. The position involves writing and editing high-quality, insightful and thoroughly researched news, analysis and features. Pay: Not listed. Get full details on this freelance real estate writing job.

Freelance Real Estate Bloggers: Clickscape is an Atlanta-based online real estate firm that runs a highly visited website at clickscape.com. We are looking for bright, hard-working freelance writers who want to blog about real estate and all things Atlanta as part of a close-knit team working to make real estate better. Pay: Not listed. Get full details on this freelance real estate writing job.

Freelance Financial Article Writer (New York, NY): Quovo is a well-funded financial technology start-up based in New York City. We’re looking for a writer to help us shape some of our innovative content ideas into fully realized articles and think pieces. This job is freelance but can be upgraded to part-time ASAP provided the individual has the right skills and gels with our team. Pay: Not listed. Get full details on this financial article writing job.

Social Media Writer/Blogger: Looking for a skilled writer who can produce unique, high quality articles on social media, social marketing, social media channels, breaking tech news and trends. This position will require research skills and the ability to produce excellent work quickly. Technical knowledge in one or more of these areas is highly recommended. Pay: DOE. Get full details on this social media writing job.

Freelance Tech Blogger: We have decision support software which assists people making quantitative models in support of decisions, who need multidimensional arrays, influence diagrams and other advanced features not available on Excel. We’re looking for a blogger to ghostwrite daily blogs for us (5 days/week) about new developments in data modeling and interesting applications of data modeling. Pay: $50 per post ($250/week). Get full details on this technical blogging job.

Freelance Columnist: Now in its fifth year of sponsoring ‘The Column Contest,’ publishing company Timothy McSweeney’s will award $500 cash prizes and 1-year writing contracts to five writers who have the best ideas for bi-weekly columns for its online publication called McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Pay: $500 + one-year contract. Deadline: August 30th. Get full details on this column writing job.

Business Writers: Prominent publication Fast Company is expanding its people and profiles coverage, and is looking for new writers to tell the ongoing stories of the most creative and dynamic people in business. Freelance (contract) and full-time positions available. Pay: Not listed. Get full details on this contract writing job.

Freelance Education Writers: SmartBrief is seeking a freelance writer to help create daily education e-mail newsletters Monday through Friday mornings. This is a deadline-intensive writing position! Our briefs summarize the top stories of the day for dozens of industry associations, and our editors work with our freelance writers to shape the content for those briefs and become an expert in the topics. Pay: Not listed. Get full details on this education writing job.

Freelance Environmental Writer: Digital media start-up in New York with a big environmental section, seeking professional research, write and edit pieces over the next two months. Must be U.S.-based and have a demonstrated track record of writing about environmental issues. Pay: Initially $15 to $30 an article; $15/hr for editing. Long term we will be hiring an environmental editor at a normal pay rate after we are past the rice-and-beans bootstrap phase. Get full details on this freelance writing/editing job.

Freelance Proofreaders/Editors: We are a proofreading and editing company that specializes in working with international, second-language graduate students. This is currently dissertation season, and we have some overflow work for perhaps two to three freelancers. We are looking for freelancers ready for immediate work with a fast turn around (24 to 48 hours). Projects currently range from 8,000 to 20,000 words. Pay: $5 per 1000 words. We pay via PayPal. Get full details on this freelance proofreading/editing job.

Freelance Weapons Writer: We are looking for a writer in the shooting sports industry. You need to have a good understanding of firearms, especially precision shooting with bolt action rifles. Preferably you are ex military or Law Enforcement. Our company manufactures rifle components and accessories. Mostly tactical. Hunting is not our target market. Pay: $30 – $50 per post, paid at end of month. Get full details on this freelance writing job.

Search Marketing Blogger: Search Marketing SaaS company looking for a skilled freelance writer to produce high quality online marketing content on a regular basis. Your role will include creating thorough, expert-level “how to” blog posts related to online marketing, SEO, Search Marketing, Adwords/PPC, Analytics, and Social Media. You will be expected to produce one or two 1000-1500 word blog posts on a regular weekly basis. Pay: List your rate. Get full details on this freelance blogging job.

Tech Blogger (Android Phones): We are looking for passionate Android phone bloggers to join our team of writers.  GizChina’s audience is growing and so is their desire to get the latest Android phone news, tips and reviews as soon as it becomes available. Pay: Competitive rates to passionate and experienced writers. Get full details on this freelance tech blogging job.

Tech Blogger (Web Development): We’re looking for experienced bloggers in the field of web development to write short articles about CSS, HTML5, jQuery, WordPress, PHP and others at a medium to advanced level for our site www.developerdrive.com. We’re looking for several writers for this position. Pay: Submit your rate per article. Get full details on this freelance tech blogging job.

Social Media Writer: Write for one of the largest social media sites on the world wide web, Social Media Examiner. Pay: Not listed. Get full details on this social media writing job.

Freelance Writer for Web Company: X4DC is a web company located in Staten Island looking for a writer that is available at a day rate. b Responsibilities include writing blog posts for companies with varying industries (we will provide detailed reference but some research is required) and creating website content (pages, lead generation pieces, etc.). Pay: Submit your rate. Get full details on this freelance writing job.

Web Content Creator (New York, NY): Turnkey Office Space is a National Office Space E-Brokerage that’s looking for a high-quality content creator to join our marketing team. We’re a startup located in Manhattan, NY. We have constant writing projects that require you are available to work regularly. This job has the potential to turn into a part time or full time position. Pay: Submit your rate. Get full details on this content creation job.

Technical Writer (Annapolis, MD): Lattice FMC Inc. is a small business specializing in management consulting solutions in technology, operations, finance, strategy and communications. We’re looking for a local technical writer to synthesize information from multiple sources into one document; and author and edit draft and final documents. Part-Time (20 hours/week); telecommute ok. Pay: Submit salary requirement. Get full details on this technical writing job.
Legitimate Work from Home Job Opportunity

P.S.: Start Your Freelance Writing Career Today!

We offer two online freelance writing classes to get you started. So whether you want to (I) specialize in SEO writing; or (II) just want to know how to become a freelance writer — period — we can help.

P.P.S.: You can now order any of our products (like the SEO writing e-course) and take up to 6 months to pay — really!

 

Read more.

The State of Freelancing: Why More Millennials are Turning to Freelancing (and Their Parents Too!)

Written by Yuwanda Black

In the post, Millennials and the Age of the Freelancer, freelance writer Lauren Tharp details why so many in her generation have come to not only accept, but embrace, this career choice. The number of Millennials who are choosing to go the non-traditional job route are only increasing. One could argue that they’ve “opted out” of the job market because they had no other choice. And instead of being angry about it, they’ve made lemonade out of “lemony” employment options.

What Is a Millennial?

In case you don’t know, a person defined as a “Millennial” belongs to the “Y” Generation (Generation Y). While the exact dates vary, it is generally defined as someone born between 1982 and 2004. Why these dates?

Authors William Strauss and Neil Howe wrote about the Millennials in Generations: The History of America’s Future, 1584 to 2069 in 1991. In 2000, they released an entire book devoted to them, titled Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation.  According to Bruce Horovitz writing in USA Today Strauss and Howe are “widely credited with naming the Millennials”. Strauss and Howe use 1982 as the Millennials’ starting birth year and 2004 as the last birth year. [Source: Wikipedia, Generation Y]

The Economic Cycle: What Millennials Have Experienced

This generation has seen everything from the Wall Street-like (led?) greed, prosperity and consumerism of the early 1980s; to the stock market crash of 1987 and the ensuing recession; to the record, decade-long period of economic prosperity throughout the 1990s; to the recession of the early 2000s.

In short, they’ve seen it all. And it’s left many of them identifying with their grandparents (who lived through the Great Depression), rather than their parents. Why/how? Because they know what tough times are like. And, when many of them graduated from college with huge student loans and a slim job market, they were forced into freelancing to make ends meet.

Freelancing Crossing Generations

Now, many Millennials are seeing their parents lose jobs and have to turn to freelancing too. So, it’s becoming a generational thing. As Ms. Tharp relays in her piece, Millennials and the Age of the Freelancer:

Many of us [Millennials] were forced into freelancing (due to a lack of “real” jobs)… In my own life, I saw both of my parents lose their full-time “real”/regular jobs in 2012 and make the switch to freelancing. The same goes for my mother-in-law, a budding solopreneur. All three of whom are over 50 years of age. . . . More and more the previous generation are finding themselves stuck in the situations we’ve been dealing with for the bulk of our adult lives.

With life events like this staring them square in the face, it’s easy to see why so many Millennials are turning to freelancing – and actually deciding to make it THE career, instead of pursuing traditional, full-time jobs. And it’s a good thing too, because many of them embrace entrepreneurship.

Millennials Predisposed to Freelancing?

This argument could be made. Why?

According to 2012 report by the US Chamber of Commerce Foundation, 27% of Millennials are self-employed, but a whopping 90% say entrepreneurship is a mindset, not an actual role. They expect to be treated like freelancers even as employees; 58% expect the standard workday to go away, the same percentage would take a flexible telework policy over pay raises and career progression, and a far greater percentage would choose to work where their opinions are valued over having a prestigious employer. They expect autonomy, flexibility, and an independent voice.

Millennials also have a rosier view of entrepreneurship than previous generations: 57% percent think being an entrepreneur is “entirely good” with no downsides. [Source: FreelancersUnion.org, 3 Ways Millennials Are Revolutionizing the World of Work]

Share Your Thoughts

Are you a Millennial? Has someone you know lost a job and turned to freelancing? Have you decided to pursue freelancing full-time or part-time? Share your thoughts/experiences in the comments section below.

Coming Features on InkwellEditorial.com

Tomorrow: Weekly list of freelance writing job leads.

Tuesday: A post by moi on why freelance writers should apply to full-time jobs. Yeah, you read that right!

Coming Features on Inkwell Editorial Companion Site SeoWritingJobs.com

Thursday: A look at putting clients on retainer. Even though my SEO writing company still accepts “one off” jobs, the way our pricing it set up, it kinda pushes this option. Fellow SEO writer Jean gave me the idea for this post when she commented on regular contributor’s Chrislyn’s post last week, writing:

Offer clients recurring/retainer-like packages. They may not want them, but enough will. As time goes on, bingo! Recurring monthly income (so sweet)!

Bookmark us to come back. Or better yet, subscribe to the newsletter (see subscription box on the right-hand side of every page); this way, you don’t miss a thing!

Share a Freelance News Tip

See an interesting story in the news about freelancing? Send it to us via the Contact link on every page of this site, or in an email to info**at**InkwellEditorial.com. We’re always looking for insightful stories from freelancers that can help others.

Best,
Yuwanda
Start Your Online Writing Career TodayP.S.: Jumpstart Your Online Writing Career
: Get 5 Ebooks for 1 Low Price! If you want to start a successful SEO writing career, this ebook package gives you EVERYTHING you need to get started — from how to market for web writing jobs, to how to deal with clients.

P.P.S.: You can now order any of our products (like the SEO copywriting course) and take up to 6 months to pay — really!

 

Read more.

2013 Trends in Freelance Writing: 4 Things I’ve Noticed by Combing Online Job Listings

Written by Yuwanda Black

In Case You Missed It . . .

Every Monday on this site, you’ll find a list of freelance writing job leads. It’s because every Sunday, I dig through tons of sites looking for writing gigs to list. It’s actually a lot of fun — and very insightful. In a post for Business2Community.com recently, I listed four trends I’ve noticed in freelance writing this year, ie:

(i) Skill sets that freelance writers should invest in to increase their earning potential;

(ii) What’s happening with online/SEO writing rates;

(iii) The upsurge for social media professionals (and how freelance writers can capitalize on it); and

(iv) How employers are embracing telecommuting, which means more opportunities to work from home (full-time) with benefits!

All these underscore that it’s a great time to become a freelance writer. I hope you enjoy the post and that it inspires you to take action if freelancing is something you’ve been thinking about.

Have a great weekend!

What You Need to Know Before You Quit to Freelance Full-timeP.S.: Are you dying to quit your job to freelance full-time? This ebook is a realistic roadmap of exactly what quitting to freelance full-time is all about. A review of this ebook left on Amazon sums it up, saying in part:

This book is just what it says. It will give you a good idea of the pros and cons of becoming a freelance writer.

I really like it that the author gives a lot of personal information about her situation. After reading this book, I feel that I have a good insight into the life of a freelancer – the pitfalls as well as the joys.

P.P.S.: Did you know that you can now order any of our products (like this freelance writing e-course) and take up to 6 months to pay? You can.

 

Read more.

Quick Tip for Freelance Writing Success

Written by Yuwanda Black

Here’s your Quick Tip for Freelance Writing Success for this week . . .

Face Whatever Fears You Have about Starting a Freelance Writing Business

Yesterday on SeoWritingJobs.com, this site’s child site, a post by new SEO writer Chrislyn Pepper struck a nerve with many. She detailed her journey into building an SEO writing business – giving a lot of insight into what her start-up fears were (are), how she dealt with them, what she did during the first weeks of her business – and so much more.

She was brutally honest.

Fears Almost Every New Freelance Writer Faces

One of the things that stuck out to me was how honest Chrislyn was about the fears that she faced, ie:

Does my website scream amateur or newbie?

Is my writing good enough?

Will someone order from me?

Are my rates too high?

Should I have my picture on my website or will that turn away business?

Is Fear Holding You Back from Pursuing a Freelance Writing Career? 3 Tips for Combatting It

I wanted to speak to this point because Chrisyln’s fears were no different than the 1,000 and 1+ other freelancers who’ve contacted me over the years. Following are three tips on how to deal with the “I want to become a freelance writer, but I’m scared s**tless of making the leap.

1. Recognize that it’s normal: Yep, we all have it. So don’t think that you’re weird, too scared and/or not normal for feeling this way. Starting a business is a big deal – and if you’re not wigged out a little bit, then I’d be worried about you.

So embrace this fear – and channel it in a positive way to help you make careful decisions on how to go about becoming a freelance writer.

Fear should not hinder your dreams. Remember, it is just an emotion; an emotion that is there to protect and guide you in making better decisions.

2. Find a Mantra That Works for You: One of the things I do when I’m confronted with a situation that scares me is to repeat my mantra.

As I wrote in the comments section of Chrislyn’s post yesterday:

If it’s [fear] something you struggle with, choose a mantra and repeat it over and over when you doubt yourself. Words are like brain food, and what you fill your brain with is what you will become. So find a saying that resonates with you, and chant, chant, chant it when doubt tries to kick in. I’ve been doing this for years. It works!

3. Take Action: One of the things that I’ve found that combats fear effectively is to take action. Doing something will make you feel empowered. And that’s because you’re “proactive,” instead of “reactive.”

Fellow freelance writer Beth spoke to this point in the comments section of Chrislyn’s post, writing:

I tend to be one that doesn’t look before they leap, so when I started not quite two years ago, I put my website up in a day and started marketing. I had my first client in two days and my next client two days after that.

I was certainly nervous as I didn’t feel I knew what I was doing, but I went with it. I still worry sometimes that someone will not like my writing, but I never show it. I don’t do a lot of things that I should . . . You don’t have to be perfect and do everything you should do. You just have to do something.

Ideas for Combating the “Startup Blues”

I hope these ideas have helped you combat any fears you may face you on the road to becoming a freelance writer. I know there are tons of other out there. Please share how you combatted the fear of starting your freelance career in the comments section below.

Have a Quick Tip for Freelance Writing Success?

Send it in. Following are the submission guidelines.

Submission Guidelines

Length: 100-250 Words

Bio: 25-50 words; a link to your freelance writing website/blog and a link to one of your social media profiles.

How to Submit: Send in the body of an email (info*at*InkwellEditorial*dot*com). Put “Freelance Quick Tip” in Subject Line.

You’ll be sent a link when/if it’s published.

Can you believe it’s Friday already! This week flew by. :-),
Yuwanda

An SEO Copywriting Training GuideP.S.: How to Write SEO Copy That Sells: Learn how to write lead-generating, sales-producing copy like the pros. Changes like Penguin 2.0 have made it harder than ever to rank well. Learning how to write SEO content (and where to most effectively distribute it) is a blog marketing basic.

This training manual holds nothing back — you’ll learn practically every trick in the book about how to write (and distribute!) SEO content to get more website/blog traffic.

P.P.S.: Did you know that you can order any of our products (like the SEO copywriting course) and take up to 6 months to pay? You can — really!

 

Read more.

Surefire Ways to Get Your Freelance Writing Business to Rank Better with Google

The following is a guest post by Karen Cioffi.

Writing and marketing go hand-in-hand. Marketing relies on writing and a writing business relies on marketing….

Read more.

Could Using Controversy Ruin Your Freelance Writing Career Before It Even Gets Started?

Written by Niall Roche

When you’re creating content for your clients, you have a couple of choices in terms of the writing style you can use, including everything from conversational all the way through to a more formal style of content writing. Obviously if you’re putting together something like a white paper, or technical training document for a client, then you’re best sticking to a formal style of writing.

Why Controversial Writing Is One of the Best Kinds of “Sticky” Content

If, on the other hand, you’re creating web content that you want people to stick around and read, then conversational writing is the best way to achieve that goal. You’ll probably find that most of your current clients are looking for a conversational tone of writing, simply because that’s the most effective writing style for publishing online.

Styles of Controversial Blogging/Writing

There are, however, a couple of sub-styles within the conversational writing style that you can use. Actually by changing the order of the letters in the word “conversational” we’ll get to the heart of today’s subject which is using a controversial writing style…and whether or not this is actually a good idea.

Controversial Blogging/Writing: Advice for Freelance WritersIf you look at the most popular pieces of content online — ones which get massive levels of exposure — you’ll notice that they’re usually pretty controversial, offensive and just totally in your face.

The Apologetic Controversial Writer: Now some writers accidentally court controversy and immediately regret the piece they’ve just written, never wanting all that attention.

The Devious, In-Your-Face, Controversial Writer: Other writers though are far more devious, knowing that a single blog post written to troll your readers can get tens of thousands of visitors.

Writing controversial content for your own blog isn’t an issue – it can even be a good thing because of the viral nature of that type of content.

The Biggest Obstacle to Writing Controversial Content: Overcome It & You’re Golden

The big problem with using controversy in any writing you do for clients though is that it’s a very fine line between being controversial and being outright offensive. So what seems like a clever and witty way for you to attract attention to your client’s blog could wind up having the exact opposite effect instead, losing them clients or even landing them in legal hot water.

Why most writers are tempted to use a controversial tone now and again is because the internet is stuffed full of boring, badly written, bland, flat and uninspiring content. It’s full of the same people writing about the same stuff, in the same way – day in and day out.

The vast majority of websites look and sound the exact same in terms of the tone of their content. Being controversial is you chomping against the bit and trying to flex your writing muscle — an understandable reaction.

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Editor Note: Did you go through the list of freelance writing job leads yesterday? They work! Freelancers have been writing in to let me know. See 7/22 listings and comments section of 8/5/2013 listings. And, good luck applying!
*******************************

Freelance Writers: When to Write Controversial Content for Your Client(s)

So should you write controversial content for your clients? Only with their express and prior approval guys – otherwise you run the risk of not only losing a client, but also damaging your reputation as a professional freelancer too.

It might be fun pissing people off now and again, but you gotta be careful how you go about doing that!

My Next Post on InkwellEditorial.com

Ever experience “vanishing client syndrome?” You know, when clients just seem to disappear out of the blue for no reason. Well, that happened to me recently. Three of my steady clients disappeared, leaving me about $2,000 in the hole when it comes to “expected income.” I’ll tell you how I handled it, what I’m doing to make sure it doesn’t happen again, and how many of these disappearing clients actually came back. That’s coming on September 3rd.

About the Author: In terms of writing, I’m pretty versatile and thanks to my background in SEO and digital marketing I know exactly what style of content works best for converting visitors into leads and sales. To date roughly 1.5 million words of my content have been published online. Yes, really! Learn more about how I can help you with your content marketing needs at http://www.RocheWrites.

Start Your Online Writing Career TodayP.S.: Jumpstart Your Freelance Writing Career: Get 5 Ebooks for 1 Low Price! If you want to start a successful freelance/SEO writing career, this ebook package gives you EVERYTHING you need to get started — from how to market for jobs, to how to deal with clients. And, there’s nothing controversial about that!

P.P.S.: You can now order any of our products (like the SEO copywriting course in Jamaica) and take up to 6 months to pay — really!

 

Read more.

Freelance Writing Jobs for the Week of 8/19/2013

Note: Some of these jobs, although freelance, may be location specific. In those cases, the location is listed.

FYI, one thing I noticed going through this week’s listings is that more freelance jobs are starting to pop up in the video and other “creative” categories, eg, infographics. So if you know how and/or want to increase your skill set, getting up to date on video editing software like Camtasia could be the route to landing more gigs  as a writer, blogger, editor, etc.

Good luck applying, and don’t forge to let me know when you land gigs. So far, we’ve had some good success stories with these listings.

SEO Writer/Blogger: We need a writer to write new content for our website as needed and to produce 2 – 4 blogs a month. We will provide you all the material needed for our blogs and content pages, you will have to write them in an SEO friendly manner.  SEO writing experience is preferred but not required. Blogs and content will be between 400 — 500 words. Pay: $25 per post. Get full details on this SEO writing job.

Freelance Tech Writer: The writer will be responsible for creating the copy for the site, about 33,000 words due within about a month’s time (or faster). Article topics, directions and research information will be provided.  Pay: $4,000 flat rate. Get full details on this tech writing job.

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Editor Note: Did you catch yesterday’s post on The State of Freelancing, which covered Who’s Freelancing, How Much They Earn & Where They Live?  Check it out; very interesting demographics on your fellow workers.
*****************************

Food Editor/Writer (Seattle, WA): Edible Seattle is seeking a creative, hands-on editor with a passion for local foods, that extends to everything from chefs and their stories to farm policy and environmental issues that relate to food production. The essence of this job is the ability to distill eclectic, complex ideas and package them into a compelling and inviting editorial form. Pay: Monthly stipend based on experience. Get full details on this freelance food writing job.

Freelance Jewelry Blogger: We are looking for an experienced writer/blogger who has past experience in jewelry, fashion, or weddings. You should have the ability to do some research, write with the target audience in mind and have some basic knowledge of SEO. We have a variety of topics in mind but would also be open to hearing new ideas from the writer. Pay: Submit your rate. Get full details on this fashion blogging job.

Freelance Floral Blogger: We are looking for a writer to supply blog content for our florist clients. The articles will be posted on the websites of retail florists, and should cover topics related to flowers and the benefits of giving and receiving flowers, etc. Pay: Submit your rate. Get full details on this blogging job.

Freelance Lifestyle Bloggers: Complex’s food and pop culture site, First We Feast (http://www.firstwefeast.com/), is hiring bloggers to start immediately. Your responsibilities will include writing 10-15 blog posts per week, including social media-oriented galleries and news posts. This is the ideal gig for a young writer looking to break into the food world. Candidates should be able to write about food and pop culture with wit and style (a love of rap music is a bonus, but by no means a prerequisite). Pay: Submit rate. Get full details on this blogging job.

Freelance Wedding Bloggers: Weddingbee is currently seeking writers who can submit high quality articles that focus on Do It Yourself (DIY) projects for real brides and others involved in wedding planning. Crafting, knitting, building, decorating . . . whatever your DIY specialty is, we have the brides looking for your tips and expertise to help them create the wedding of their dreams.  All you need is a computer, Internet access, and the ability to deliver clean, informative and energetic copy. Pay: Starting at $25 per post. Get full details on this blogging job.

Freelance Guest Bloggers: We are seeking organized & professional Writers/Bloggers who already have existing Author Accounts on high authority websites to join our growing Guest Post Team!  The sites with your existing authorship should be authoritative and can be anything from News sites, How To Sites, Niche Specific Sites, etc. Example Sites: HuffingtonPost, The New York Times, About, SF Weekly, La Weekly, Mashable, TED, Forbes, Men’s Health, etc. Pay: $50-$300 per post. Get full details on this blogging job.

Freelance Travel Writers: Calling travel writers who have traveled extensively in one or all of the following countries: Australia and / or New Zealand; and/or South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania: Specifically, on safari. This is your opportunity to write for an award-winning luxury travel site. We are seeking passionate travel writers who can help us rewrite our outdated travel content to make it unique, engaging, interesting, and compelling, based on first-hand experience of the destinations. Pay: Depends on experience. Get full details on this travel writing job.

Freelance Tech Reporter: OTR Global (OTR®) compares and contrasts extensive marketplace data and prepares research reports for institutional investors (primarily mutual funds and hedge fund managers).  We are seeking a tech reporter who can interview sources via the phone and enter the interviews into OTR Global’s propriety database in a timely manner. Pay: $45 per hour. Get full details on this tech reporting job.

Freelance Video Bloggers: FitDay.com, a leading fitness and nutrition site, is looking for video bloggers.  We want energetic, positive, creative and enterprising people to make short 1-3 minute videos about all things health and fitness – from exercise to cooking. Pay: $75 per accepted video. Get full details on this freelance video blogging job.

Freelance Copywriter: Web design company, http://www.southernwebgroup.com, seeks a freelance copywriter to assist with various writing assignments. Writing assignments include: blog posts, website content and newsletter copy. This position will be responsible for drafting between 30-50 assignments per month. Pay: Paid per word or per article. Get full details on this freelance copywriting job.

Freelance Science Writers: We have an immediate opening for a biologist or environmental scientist for telecommuting work. The work consists of creating ancillary materials for undergraduate textbooks in the Life Sciences. Pay: $35 to $50 USD Per Hour. Get full details on this educational writing job.

Freelance Content Editors: Online marketing firm, focused on education industry, is looking for content editors. Candidates of all backgrounds and from any location will be considered. Hiring will depend on candidate’s outstanding ability to read, comprehend, synthesize and write about various higher education topics. Position entails re-writing specific passages of text derived from open-source content. Ability to write quickly, clearly, and succinctly is extremely important. Pay: $12 to $15 per hour; flexible hours ranging from 10-30 hours per week. Get full details on this editing/writing job.

Freelance Infographics Creators (Data Journalists): Visual.ly is expanding its team of freelance data journalists – particularly those with interest and experience in business, personal finance and technology – to work on a wide variety of data visualization/ infographic projects for our clients. Think of a project as researching a topic for an article, but writing an outline or script for an infographic instead. You will work directly with a client and a designer, who will be responsible for molding your script into the infographic or data visualization in question. Pay: Per project basis. Get full details on this freelance journalism job.

Freelance Tech Blogger: Looking for a tech blogger that can write a few sentences about the top tech stories of the day in a casual, fun and engaging tone. You must be up to date with all the latest tech news resources and be able to find and share links with our audience. Pay: Send your rates. Get full details on this freelance tech blogging job.

Freelance Content Writers (Houston, TX): SSD Fair Marketing is currently seeking out writers with talent and experience to contribute content covering a variety of different topics for our vast client base. Your content will be shared with thousands of readers every day. Opportunities for writers involve 500-700 word articles/blogs that require the ability to write informatively about a number of different fields, including Business, Finance, Nutrition, Travel, Technology, Fitness, and more. Pay: Writing assignments start at $20-$30 per article and payments are delivered twice per month. Get full details on this writing job.

Coming Features on InkwellEditorial.com

Tomorrow: A post by new regular contributor Niall Roche on “controversial blogging/writing,” as in, is it something you should do for your clients (or yourself). While it can lead to loads of traffic, it does have a down side. This post will make you think 

Wednesday: Wanna get your freelance writing business’s website to rank better so you land more clients? Regular contributor Karen Cioffi lays out four effective strategies that can help you achieve this objective. It’s also knowledge that you can use when you pitch clients for writing jobs.

Coming Features on Inkwell Editorial Companion Site SeoWritingJobs.com

Thursday: New regular contributor Chrislyn Pepper talks about the first three lessons she learned as a brand new SEO writer. Here’s an excerpt:

I’ve been writing since 2003, but until starting my SEO writing business last month, I’ve been what Yuwanda calls a “Looky Loo writer”. There was no paid writing gig I didn’t try to get. I wrote for fun and extra cash, because my full-time job paid the bills. In early 2012, I found myself without a job after 10 years in the same place. I had bills, so I began writing with purpose. By March 2013, I routinely wrote six 300-word articles per day at $11 each for one content mill.

Stay tuned!

Hope your week starts off fantastically.
Yuwanda
coverP.S.: Ready to start your freelance career? As these freelance writing opportunities illustrate, there are lots of different jobs out there.

Get the ebook that pushed my freelance writing career to the next levelallowing me to travel and live abroad, get out of debt and really “live the freelance life.” One freelancer wrote:

Hey Yuwanda,

I hope all is well! I just wanted to let you know that this month marked the first month that my writing income surpassed that of my day job. Thanks to your help and inspiration, I have more work than I know what to do with and have successfully landed a number of clients that give me recurring work. Thanks again for your advice!

Editor Note: This freelancer sent this email in on March 1, 2013. He purchased Inkwell Editorial’s SEO writing ebook in April 2012. And not even a year later, he made this kind of progress.

P.P.S.: You can now order any of our products (like the SEO copywriting course) and take up to 6 months to pay. Reserve your spot for the class in Jamaica for only $147!

 

Read more.

The State of Freelancing: Who’s Freelancing, How Much They Earn & Where They Live

Written by Yuwanda Black

I ran across an interesting post on The Atlantic that gave a lot of demographic information about freelancers in the U.S., ie, which professions have the most freelancers; how much per hour they earn on average; and which cities have the highest-earners.

Following is a quick snapshot of this info, and some conclusions drawn from the data. Some of it may surprise you (eg, how much freelancers in certain sectors earn); and some of it won’t (eg, which professions have the most freelancers).

Which Professions Have the Most Freelancers: The Top 5 Freelance Niches

A bit more than 7% of the American workforce is self-employed. Of these, 43% are “members of the creative class of scientists and technologists, knowledge workers and professionals, artists, designers, entertainers, and media workers.” Note: Freelance writers fall in this group.

Following is a further breakdown.

(i) Arts, Entertainment, Media: 26.7% [Note: This, of course, is the group freelance writers fall in.]

(ii) Personal Care: 22.8%;

(iii) Construction & Extraction: 22.6%;

(iv) Legal Professionals: 17.9%; and

(v) Building & Grounds Cleaning: 17.6%.

Which Freelance Niches Earn the Most: The Top 5

The following shows the average wage earned per hour by freelancers in a particular niche.

(i) Healthcare Practitioners and Technical: $49.66;

(ii) Life, Physical, and Social Science: $32.17;

(iii) Architecture and Engineering: $26.75;

(iv) Business and Financial Operations: $25.83; and

(v) Computer and Mathematical: $24.67.

As you can see, the niche that includes freelance writers (Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports & Media) is not in the top five. It’s actually number 10 on the list, and is a mere $16.19. For comparison, full-time workers in this niche earn just over 25% more ($20.76).

Which Cities in America Do Freelancers Earn the Most: The Top 5

(i) San Jose: Freelancers earn a median wage of $30.75 per hour. This was followed by …

(ii) Washington, D.C.: where the median wage is $28.42;

(iii) San Francisco came in at #3, where freelancers earn $26.68;

(iv) Boston slid into the fourth spot: Freelancers had a median wage of $25.03; and rounding out the Top 5 is …

(v) New York: Where the median hourly wage slid just below $25 per hour ($24.74).

Which Cities in America Do “CREATIVE” Freelancers Earn the Most: The Top 5

This list is very similar to the one above, ie:

(i) San Jose: Creative freelancers earned a median wage of 26.42;

(ii) Washington, D.C.: $25.55;

(iii) Boston: $25.39;

(iv) Philadelphia: $25.21; and

(v) New York ($25.10).

So large metropolitan areas seem to be where the highest earning potential is for freelancers. But, when you take into account the cost of living in these cities, this is not surprising. If you don’t live in a large metropolis and you earn less, I’m willing to bet that percentage wise, what you earn is on par with big city freelancers.

The Most Interesting Statistic on Freelancers in America

While freelancers in most niches tended to earn less than their full-time counterparts, only 13 percent of those surveyed said they wanted to go back to traditional employment.

And, the “happiness quotient” is something you can’t hang a statistical number on.

Read the full report on freelancing in America in The Atlantic. It’s really fascinating.

Coming Features on InkwellEditorial.com

Tomorrow: Weekly list of freelance writing job leads.

Tuesday: A post by new regular contributor Niall Roche on “controversial blogging/writing,” as in, is it something you should do for your clients (or yourself). While it can lead to loads of traffic, it does have a down side. This post will make you think 

Wednesday: Wanna get your freelance writing business’s  website to rank better so you land more clients? Regular contributor Karen Cioffi lays out four effective strategies that can help you achieve this objective. It’s also knowledge that you can use when you pitch clients for writing jobs.

Coming Features on Inkwell Editorial Companion Site SeoWritingJobs.com

Thursday: New regular contributor Chrislyn Pepper talks about the first three lessons she learned as a brand new SEO writer. Here’s an excerpt:

I’ve been writing since 2003, but until starting my SEO writing business last month, I’ve been what Yuwanda calls a “Looky Loo writer”. There was no paid writing gig I didn’t try to get. I wrote for fun and extra cash, because my full-time job paid the bills. In early 2012, I found myself without a job after 10 years in the same place. I had bills, so I began writing with purpose. By March 2013, I routinely wrote six 300-word articles per day at $11 each for one content mill.

As always, hope you’ll bookmark us to come back. Or better yet, subscribe to the newsletter (see subscription box on the right-hand side of every page); this way, you don’t miss a thing!

Share a Freelance News Tip

See an interesting story in the news about freelancing? Send it to us via the Contact link on every page of this site, or in an email to info**at**InkwellEditorial.com. We’re always looking for insightful stories from freelancers that can help others.

Best,
Yuwanda
Start Your Online Writing Career TodayP.S.: Jumpstart Your Online Writing Career
: Get 5 Ebooks for 1 Low Price! If you want to start a successful SEO writing career, this ebook package gives you EVERYTHING you need to get started — from how to market for web writing jobs, to how to deal with clients.

P.P.S.: You can now order any of our products (like the SEO copywriting course) and take up to 6 months to pay — really!

 

Read more.

Failure to Launch! The Top 5 Mistakes Writers Make in Transitioning to Full-time Freelancing

Written by Yuwanda Black

In Case You Missed It . . .

I had the distinct pleasure of doing a guest post this past week for Pen & Prosper, a freelance writing blog published by Jennifer Brown Banks. She asked me to do a post on some of the most frequent mistakes professionals make when they transition from the corporate world to freelancing full-time.

I could have gone on forever! BECAUSE . . .

If there’s a mistake to be made in freelancing, I’ve made it. I’ve been a freelance writer for over two decades now (since 1993 — and no, I can’t believe it’s been that long!) and I’m sure I’m not done yet.

Transitioning from a Full-time, 9-to-5 Job to Freelancing: Can You Do It Mistake-Free?

The thing is, as technology and the needs of clients change, the types of mistakes you make will change. Hence, there’s no way to make the transition without making some kind of mistake. But, they don’t have to be the ones I listed because you can learn from someone who’s “been there and done that.”

Before clicking over to the in-depth post on Jennifer’s blog, there’s one more thing I want to say . . .

Don’t let your fears paralyze you or get in the way of starting a freelance writing business. It’s likely going to be scary at first. This is normal, like any new thing you start. But there is plenty of work out there. Plenty!

There’s Plenty of Freelance Writing Work Out There & Here’s Where It Is

As regular contributor Tiffany so eloquently outlined in this tutorial on how to get corporate writing jobs, much of it is in the B2B sector. Proof?

B2B content marketing is seen as a progressively efficient strategy with a game-high 82% of survey respondents planning to increase their content production over the next 12 months. . . . Some of the top challenges facing B2B Content Marketers include 55% of respondents battling enough time and bandwidth to create content. While the next hurdle is producing engaging content (49%), followed by producing enough content variety to cater for the assorted marketing programs (39%). [Source: Marketing Mag, The end of whitepapers? 2013 B2B content marketing survey results]

These statistics highlight the fact that not only are there tons of opportunities in freelance writing out there, businesses are having to outsource a lot of it because they: (i) don’t have time to produce much of it in-house; and (ii) they have so many outlets they need to feed with constant content.

Your job as a freelance writer? Be proactive in going after the work.

Now, over to my post on Jennifer’s blog — and enjoy your weekend!

What You Need to Know Before You Quit to Freelance Full-timeP.S.: Are you dying to quit your job to freelance full-time? This ebook is a realistic roadmap of exactly what quitting to freelance full-time is all about. A review of this ebook left on Amazon sums it up, saying in part:

This book is just what it says. It will give you a good idea of the pros and cons of becoming a freelance writer.

I really like it that the author gives a lot of personal information about her situation. After reading this book, I feel that I have a good insight into the life of a freelancer – the pitfalls as well as the joys.

P.P.S.: Did you know that you can now order any of our products (like this freelance writing e-course) and take up to 6 months to pay? You can.

 

Read more.