facebookrsspinteresttwitterinfostart

Archives for November 2012

A Freelance Writer’s Life Abroad: Inside Peek at My Life as an American Living in Negril, Jamaica for a Year, Part XXIII

Last year, I did the Reggae Marathon here in Jamaica and just never got around to posting the pics. So as I’m about to embark on this adventure again tomorrow, I thought I’d share what I’ll be seeing/going through as you’re probably tucked snug in your bed….

Read more.

Sample “Thank the Editor” Letter: 7 Points You Should Cover That Can Help You Land More Freelance Assignments

The following is a guest post by Noelle Sterne.

Thank an editor, you’re wondering, for what? An editor is my sworn enemy, whose bastions must be stormed and armies of red-pen-wielding assistants vanquished for the cherished prize of publication. 

Reasons You May NOT Want to Thank an Editor

Maybe your metaphors are a little tamer, but you probably feel this way for one of two reasons:

A. Despite your dogged deluges of submissions, no one has published you and you secretly feel no one ever will. 

B.  Your countless drafts and dared emailed submission on a 200-word piece have finally reaped a small magazine’s acceptance. Four months after the piece appeared, you received a whopping payment of two contributors’ copies, which arrived in your mailbox folded like a limp accordion. When, hands shaking, you opened to your page, a printing error obscured nine-tenths of your name. 

Such blunders and disappointments are inevitable.

Thanking an Editor8 Reasons to Thank an Editor

Nevertheless, whether you get paid in dollars, copies, a six-month subscription, or an autographed picture of the editor’s twin Dobermans, it makes sense to thank the editor for several reasons:

1. It’s polite.

OK, admittedly weak. You may have dumped this as a reason for anything the moment you left your parents’ house. Keep reading.

2. It’s thoughtful.

We writers are prone to self-pity and narcissism: we’re unappreciated geniuses, the publishing world is against us, the hacks get the breaks, etc., etc. By thanking the editor, you’re going beyond your self-absorbed world and extending yourself outward to one of those in your writing world who matter most.

 3. Thanking the editor says you realize editors are people too. 

They toil so we can have a vehicle for our writing, boast to friends and relatives, especially our fancy-attorney big sister, and chalk up another notch on our resumes. Don’t editors deserve a little recognition and appreciation?

4. Thanking the editor acknowledges the partnership. 

We tend to have a love-hate relationship with editors. Sometimes we feel we’d do anything to get them to publish us, even to cutting the guts out of our most labored-over beloved creation. Sometimes we’re sure they’ll never publish anyone, especially a writer who slides in on the slush pile. Sometimes we’re certain they have a stash of in-house writers chained in the basement, hollow-eyed and starving, feverishly grinding out everything that ever appears in the magazine. Sometimes we think editors exist only to torment us with the dreaded “R” word. 

When we thank the editor, we neutralize all this erroneous, self-defeating, and egotistical thinking.

5. Thanking the editor is politically savvy.

The editor will remember your thoughtfulness and likely regard your next submission with kinder, gentler eyes. At least you’ll get to the top of the pile faster. And when you submit after you’re published, which should be very soon after, you can refer to your letter of gratitude.

Some writers, building on the editor’s good judgment in the current publication, attach the next submission with the thank you letter for the first—a fine idea. See the sample letter at the end of this article.

6. You can always find something to thank the editor for. 

I do not mean how well your published piece reads. Praise of your own words should come from the droves of readers who write in thanking the editor for publishing your piece.

Instead, you can find many things to extol:  the layout, the headings, when or where in the publication the piece appears, that cute cartoon near the title, the judicious editing of your 500-word bio, or, if you’re really scraping, the font style. See sample below.

7. Thanking the editor feels good.

This relates to number 2 above. Thoughtful acts feel good. Getting out of yourself feels good. And the universal law applies: when we give, in this case a thank you note, we receive in return. We receive not only a good feeling but a possibly more favorable reading of our next submission and certainly a greater sense of equality and mastery.

8. When you thank the editor, you’re thanking yourself.

For your growth as a writer, this last is the most profound. Your note is really a letter to yourself. It says, “I am a professional. I am a writer. I have a file of letters to editors who have published my work. I’m part of the community of writers and editors.” Now how do you feel?

These reasons show you that thanking the editor is more than a pandering gesture or another endless administrative task that keeps you from your writing. Rather, it’s a lesson in self-worth, expansiveness, and professional empowerment. At the least, it’s an opportunity to produce a sincere little gem. See the sample again. 

Should You Thank an Editor If You’re Not Yet Published?

If you’re not published yet? Write the letter anyway. You don’t have to mail it. Label a file with the names of each publication and editor, call it “Correspondence,” and put your letter in it.

When you write it, you’ll be “acting as if,” visualizing in advance the outcome you desire. After consistent application of butt to chair and fingers to keyboard, this is one of the most direct and meaningful things you can do toward reaching your dream of publishing.

And when, on that miraculous day, you open the issue and see your byline and piece staring back at you (with no typos), you’ll be ready. Your letter of thanks will speed from your typing fingers to the editor’s desk, eyes, and heart.

Sample “Thank the Editor” Letter: 7 Points You Should Definitely Cover

This letter is a model for your own. Change the details as applicable. The numbers following each paragraph refer to the explanatory notes after the letter.

Priscilla Powerful, Editor

Writer’s Last Hope 
450 Winnebago Way
Campgrounds, WA 98038

Dear Ms. Powerful:

Appreciate receiving the four copies of the June issue of Writer’s Last Hope in payment for publication of my article, “Don’t Feel Licked: Keep Hoping to Your Last Stamp.” (1)

I was pleased to see this article featured in the front [back, middle, last page] of the magazine. The striking layout effectively highlighted the main points for the reader. (2)

In reading the magazine, I found your editorial, “What’s the Use of Keeping On Keeping On?” not only enlightening but inspiring. I’m sure this piece will also help many other writers who are your readers. (3)

Toward further helping your readers, I enclose another piece for your consideration. For writers who are sick from overexposure to rejection slips, my 600-word “Blow Your Nose and Reboot Your Laptop” offers encouraging hints. (4)

I have shared your publication with many writing friends. Your dedication continues to provide much-needed hope to both beginning and more experienced writers. (5)

By the way, congratulations on your second-place award in the annual Northwestern Conference of Small Writing Magazines Published in Campgrounds. (6)

In eternal writing hope,
Winona Writer

Enc/SASE/Your preferred email address. (7)

Explanatory “Thank the Editor” Notes

1. Identify the payment, issue, and your piece by name.

2. Specify the reasons for your thanks. Don’t lay it on too thick. One or two points are enough.

3. Compliment something else in the issue, preferably something by the editor. Next choice: a major feature (not yours). (See also number 6)

4. Jump on the bandwagon. Press your advantage. What’s to lose?

5. This is a more global compliment, reporting increased circulation to the editor and doubtless boosting her hope.

6. An alternative or addition to 3.

7. Always!

About the Author: Noelle Sterne is the author of Trust Your Life: Forgive Yourself and Go After Your Dreams, which can be found via the following outlets: Unity, Amazon, Barnes&Noble.com, Kindle, Nook, iBooks, ReaderStore, Kobo. She can be found online at www.trustyourlifenow.com.

Read more.

A Freelance Writer’s Life Abroad: Inside Peek at My Life as an American Living in Negril, Jamaica for a Year, Part XXII

I literally cannnot believe it’s been over a year since I posted to this series! My, how time flies.

I’m back in Jamaica for a month for the Reggae Marathon, and to scout hotels for the SEO copywriting training seminar (which I’ll be doing next week and will announce in early December when I get back home).

I usually spend the bulk of my time in Negril when I come to Jamaica, only leaving for a few days at a time to go to the mineral springs in the Blue Mountains.

This time though, I got out of Negril for 7 days, spending time in Ocho Rios (or “Ochi” as Jamaicans call it); Port Antonio and of course, the mineral springs. (Note: Access all posts in the Living in Negril series at the bottom of this page).

In the map of Jamaica below (click for larger view), I’ve circled the places I spent time in (in red). The green line is the route we took this time. I’ve been to all 14 parishes (a parish is like a “state” in the U.S.) in Jamaica. 

MapofJamaica

The orange line shows the route we usually take to the Blue Mountains, leaving Negril and heading thru Savanna-la-Mar, etc. (Sav, as the locals say), then to the Blue Mountains and back down the other side, coming thru Montego Bay to wind up back in Negril.

This time, we only traversed half the island (leaving Negril and going the other direction — to Montego Bay, etc. first). Not travelling the entire island on this occasion was nice because I got to actually SEE some stuff, not just pass thru.

************************
Editor Note: This series is seeking a sponsor (eg, airline, phone company, travel firm, luggage seller, etc.). If interested, send email via “Contact” page and let’s discuss. Access links to every post in this series at the end of this page. Enjoy!
************************

Tourist Attraction: My Day at Columbus Park in Discovery Bay in Jamaica

One of the first stops my friend and I made was Columbus Park (Discovery Bay in St. Ann’s). It’s a small, open-air museum. Totally free to enter – it literally just pops up on the side of the road and overlooks the sea. Gorgeous view, great for taking pictures, so if you go, make sure your camera battery is charged, ok?

Following are some links to some pics and some of what I learned there (Note: click all photos for larger views).

Mural at Front of Park: Gorgeous!

Jamaica in 1494: Caption says — Jamaica in 1494: A botanical investigation of 1956 revealed that the enclosed area, undisturbed for centuries because of its inaccessibility and its rocky soil, had preserved the indigenous plant life as I must have appeared in 1494 in which year Christopher Columbus is believed to have sailed into the nearby harbour now known as Discovery Bay.

What I Learned about the “Banana Boat” Song: Know the “Banana Boat” song sung by Harry Belafonte in the 50’s? Well, it was originally a Jamaican folk song. Part of the lyrics go “Come mister tally man, tally me banana …

Well this is a shot of a “Tally machine”. This park is full of the industrial machinery dating back from that time — from the 1600’s and beyond. I was amazed at how much machinery was used during this time — and how “developed” it was. There were machines for shucking corn — and a whole bunch more I forgot and couldn’t explain. Even though the park is small, it’s very interesting walking around seeing everything — especially when you’re with a local who acts as a knowledgeable tour guide.

Speaking of . . .

Tip the Helper: The gentlemen in the white shirt acted as our guide around the park for abt 20 mins. He also generously took photos of us. I gave him $300J (about $4 U.S.) for his time. FYI, if you’re ever in Jamaica at a tourist spot, this is standard practice (for a local to act as a guide with the understanding that you will tip them for their time).

The Tally: I’ll never be able to hear the Banana Boat song again without thinking of this sign and that machine.

Me in “Jail”: Inside the “Tally”. It felt like jail . . . I would not be a good prisoner. Even for the few seconds I was in there I got claustrophobic and couldn’t wait to get out. Yep, enough to keep me on the straight and narrow!

Logwood Scale: Sign says, “This scale was located at Pantrepant in the Parish of Trelawny. It was  used to weigh logwood, which was used extensively as dyestuff from the 16th century and was among Jamaica’s prime exports from that time until the 1930’s. Logwood dye gives a beautiful black on wool, nylon, silk and rayon. Enhancement of the colour value of the wood depends on oxidation and there was a time when pretreatment for that purpose was achieved by frequent urination on stacks of chips for periods of up to a few months.”

Coffee Machine: The sign says — Coffee Pulper: Used to extract coffee bean prior to drying.

Locomotive:  Sign says — Planet Locomotive: Equipped with a horizontally opposed 4-cylinder, 2 stroke 20 hp diesel engine was last in operation at some estate (couldn’t make out the name). It was used to haul sugar cane from field to factory and was capable of a maximum load pulling capaciy of 60 tons. It was taken out of service in 1960 and is estimated to have hauled 4,000,000 tons of cane.

Shipping Out! On the “bow” of this partial ship at Columbus Park. It was a gorgeous day to experience this — the weather couldn’t have been more beautiful.

So Much to See: There’s so much interesting stuff to see at Columbus Park. Even my friend, who’s a Jamaican and has been here many times, had a great time reading about these artifacts.

The Ever Beautiful Caribbean Sea: Shot from the bow of the partial ship.

Cross: I just loved the serenity of this shot. It reminded me of God (or whomever your creator is) watching over his beautiful creation — that blue, blue ocean. Yes, it REALLY is that blue and beautiful.

Overview of Park: Again, it’s a small park, but incredibly beautiful with some amazing artifacts.

Another “Overview” Shot: As one of my Twitter followers noted, “That water!”

Incredible View: Just another gorgeous view to enjoy (shot taken from front of park overlooking the sea).

On the Road Again: It was a gorgeous day to be travelling by car.

FYI, we were only at the park about half an hour. It’s a nice place to stop and have lunch (that you bring with you cuz there’s no food there) and relax in the shade for a bit before hitting the road again.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this entry – and learned something. It’s one of the reasons I love travelling – IMO, it’s an education unlike no other.

Now, time to go work off some of those Thanksgiving rum punches — gonna get my workout on!

Yuwanda
P.S.: Wanna join me in Jamaica and learn how to start a high-earning career as an SEO writer so you can travel also?

Register for the SEO copywriter training class. A nominal deposit reserves your spot. Learning SEO is about so much more than learning a new skill; it’s about changing (taking control of) your life! Proof? See average salary of SEO writers in graphic just below.

P.P.S.: Avoid freelance writing dry spells by making extra money as an affiliate marketer. How? Learn how to earn $50-$150/day online pretty seamlessly in the best-selling ebook, How to Make Money Placing Ads on Free Classified Ad Sites.

Copyright © 2012: Just a reminder — All material on this site is copyright protected and cannot be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the editor’s written consent (linking to is fine).

Read more.

Happy Thanksgiving My Friends

I’m a grateful person on an every day basis. I lost my parents in my early 20’s — and they were only in their mid-40s — so I’ve always had an apprecation for how precious life is and to be grateful for every second.

Following are a few of the things I’m particularly grateful for today . . .

Family: I have the best — and not just immediate ones. The love I receive from Aunts, Uncles and cousins — as if we inhabited the same house — makes me feel like I’m wrapped in a giant hug all the time. We are a touchy, feely lot — and I love that about being a “Black” (my family name).

Friends: I’ve had the same close circle of friends for more than 15 years — some for close to 25. Even though we don’t see each other often as we’ve moved, had children, gotten married/divorced, etc., we still remember each other on special occasions like the holidays. And when we do get together, it’s as if the years we haven’t seen each other just melt away.

They say you can look at a person’s five closest friends and learn almost everything you need to know about them. Well in my case, that means I’m a saint (I may be the devil in the lot!). My friends are loyal, funny, smart, accepting — and most of all, full of love.

I love you Vin, Colleen, Camie, Gregg, Rochelle, Eric, Al — and quite a few others who are too numerous to name.

Work: I’m lucky enough to be self-employed. Although I get frustrated with projects at times, I’m always mindful of how blessed I am to have a “job” I enjoy — and the flexibility it allows me in life.

As a freelance writer, self-publisher and internet marketer, I can work from anywhere in the world — as long as I have an internet connection.

For example, as I’m writing this post, I’m looking out over the ocean from one of my favorite haunts here in Negril, Jamaica. And, I’m working on a project that will earn me enough to pay for this month-long working vacay — and then some.

So yeah, I love my “job!”

Health: I’m a runner (in fact, I’m here in Jamaica for the Reggae Marathon), and while I do it for vanity’s sake to a certain degree (eg, to keep those ever-appearing, over age 40 pounds off), I do it mainly to stay healthy.

Happy ThanksgivingMy mom died at 45 from breast cancer; my father passed away at 47. I’m 46 now. I want to live a long, healthy life — which unfortunately does not happen a lot in my family.

So I lace up and hit the road at least 3-5 times a week. Good health is a privilege, and I try to do my part to maintain it.

My Online Community: As in, other freelancers. Readers (like you!) of my blogs, books and websites keep me on my toes in that you make me want to do better because how can I preach (teach) you if I’m not “walking the walk” myself.

So thank you — for your praise, your criticism, your wit, your questions and your passion for success. Some days, an email I receive from one of you is the only thing that keeps me going (especially the ones telling me how what you learned here helped you get out of a job you hate).

Thanksgiving in Jamaica

One of my American friends here in Jamaica organized a potluck dinner, so we’re gathering at a mutual friend’s bar to eat, drink and truly be merry!

What are you grateful for this Thanksgiving?

What are you doing? Where will you be? Please share in the comments section below. And however you’re celebrating, please be safe — and have fun. After all, it’s what the holidays are all about, no?

Yuwanda
Find this post informative? Please RT It and Follow Inkwell Editorial on Twitter.

coverP.S.: Get the freelance writing opportunity that allowed me to be financially secure enough to travel, live abroad, get out of debt and really “live the freelance life!”

P.P.S.: Want to start a successful career where you have the mobility to live and work where you please?

Visit our freelance writing bookstore for a ton of opportunities (freelance writing and internet marketing) to get you started.

Read more.

Self-Publishing Secrets: 3 Mistakes I Made When I First Started Out that Cost Me a Ton of Money

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’ve probably read where I recently became a contributor to e-Junkie.info. The site publishes info on everything from self-publishing to internet marketing. In short, it features content on how to become a successful online entrepreneur – no matter how you choose to do that.

My most recent article on the site discloses some mistakes I made early on in my self-publishing career (well, more than early on – as I committed many of these mistakes for years!). I hope you learn – and earn – from them if you’re an ebook writer.

In other news, the . . .

Living in Jamaica Series Is Back

I’ve received quite a few emails since I stopped writing this series as to when it will start up again. Well, I’m in in the midst of a month-long stay here in gorgeous Jamaica; I’m here for the Reggae Marathon, which is coming up on the 1st of December. I’ve been training my toukas off – and working as well.

New Freelance Writing Clients Coming Out of My Ears!

It seems whenever I travel, I tend to earn more. I’ve landed two new clients since I’ve been here (two weeks exactly as of today) and have projects due for both within the next 7 days. I will be working over the Thanksgiving holiday; I don’t mind as Thanksgiving is a uniquely American holiday, which (obviously) is not celebrated here in Jamaica.

I have friends here, but most of them are native Jamaicans or from other countries (eg, Canada), so it’s not like I’ll be missing anything by working. Thanksgiving is just another day here in Jamaica. I do miss home though – terribly! I was here in Jamaica last year over the Thanksgiving holiday, and while I had a nice time, it’s wasn’t the same as celebrating at home with friends and family.

FYI, a new post in the “Living in Jamaica” series will be posted this Friday. I know most of you will be stuffed with turkey leftovers and taking a nap on (probably) a relative’s couch. But if you log on, it’ll give you some “mindless, fun” reading to do if you just want to drown out your tipsy Uncle Bob or loquacious Aunt Mable.

BTW, I’ve been posting some Jamaica pics on my Twitter stream if you’re interested.

If you’re travelling this holiday – by land, sea, or air – please be careful. And have some fun darnit! You work hard, you deserve it. 🙂

Update: 10:39 a.m. EST U.S. (and in Jamaica): I was out for my morning workout and ran into one of my American friends here. Apparently, I will be part of a Thanksgiving dinner celebration after all. She told me that she’s commandeered a friend’s bar for a potluck. Everyone is to bring something — she’s bringing the turkey. Think I’m gonna contribute a fruit salad.

So, I’ll be up extra early on Thanksgiving morning to put in 4-5 hours of work, then head to “Thanksgiving dinner” here in Jamaica at around 12:30.

Psyched!

P.S.: Ever wished you could pick up, move and live/work from a tropical island paradise like Jamaica?

Well you can – and it’s easier than you think. This ebook provides step-by-step instructions – you’ll learn how to start planning as much as a year out – on how do it.

x-click-but22 This “change your life kit” is only $59.95.
[See all Inkwell Editorial Titles that Help You Live the Freelance Life!]

All the Info You Need to Create a Portable Lifestyle to Live Anywhere You Want

MovetoCaribbean-Cover-medNothing is left to chance. There is detailed budget information, 7 steps on how to create a mobile working lifestyle, what to expect as far as daily living, how to find an apartment, how much to expect to pay, how to get utilities turned on and so much more.

Read more.

How to Set Freelance Writing Rates for Online Writing Jobs: A Definitive Guide to Setting (and Getting) the Rates You Deserve

Wondering what to charge for blogging jobs, SEO writing jobs, social media posting jobs, etc.? Now you don’t have to! …

Read more.

Free Ebook on What You Need to Know When Publishing Your First Ebook: Info from 11 Successful Self-Publishers

If you’re a regular reader of this site or any of my other blogs, you know that I love to travel. And, one of my favorite destinations is Jamaica, where I happen to be spending a month now as I train for the upcoming Reggae Marathon. So, what does this have to do with the title of this post?

Well, one of the main reasons I’m able to travel – and still make money – is that I have four income streams and one of them is self-publishing (writing and selling ebooks online). I receive a lot – a lot! – of questions from aspiring self-publishers about how to write an ebook, how to market an ebook, what’s involved in the self-publishing process, etc.

In just a bit, I’ll answer some questions I received recently from an aspiring self-publisher.

But, back to the title of this post. Because I blog so much about how to write, publish and sell ebooks online, I was recently approached by e-Junkie (a site I recently started blogging for) to be a part of their ebook project – which was an ebook entitled, Publishing Your First Ebook.

Self-Publishing Success: FREE Info on Everything from Ebook Marketing to Ebook Publishing Tools

The ebook is a compilation of some great advice by 11 self-publishers (myself included). It covers everything from ebook marketing, to what to write about, to important ebook publishing tools – and a whole bunch more.

Valuable Insight from 11 Successful Self-Publishers on Self-Publishing Your First EbookAnd, it’s free! Download it here. Note: If you have problems accessing the link, see info in the P.P.S. section at the end of this post.

FYI, you can find my contributions on pages 50-60: (Article — How to Write an eBook: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Self-Publishing) and pages 74-81 (Article – 5 Things New Self-Publishers Should Know that Will Help Sell More Ebooks).

Enjoy!

Now, to the recent email I received from a new ebook author.

Question from an Aspiring Self-Publisher about Copyright, Formatting, Ebook Covers, ISBNs, Etc.

She wrote:

I am an artist who recently completed several books. I am interested in self publishing them as ebooks only at this time. Not sure if I will ever want them to be hard copy versions.

This will be my first time publishing an ebook or even a book at all. I have done some research on the Internet, but am getting confused. Looking for someone who has some kind of experience in just publishing a book as an ebook only and dose not have a hard copy published of it yet before the ebook.

Have some questions too ask. not really looking for anyone to publish it for me.

My questions are:

Do you need a logo for ebook?

Is it a good idea to have a logo for the ebook or it doesn’t make a difference?

Do i need an ISBN# right away for just publishing an ebook or can I get it latter when I decide that I want to publish the book in traditional form.

How should you or do you design/ create a copyright pg for an ebook that was not in a printed form?

Even if i do currently want the book to remain an ebook only should I cover the copyrights of a printed book as well in my copyright page?

I wish to publish my ebook on several different ebook sites. Do I need to ad each ebook site as if it was an actual publishing printing company?

I want to publish my ebook in many different digital ways (kindle, nook, web, iphone, ibook, ipad …. and so on. What would the ideal format and file detentions/ resolution be to cover all digital ways?

Is there a way to save your digital book file as one file for all digital devices etc?

My Answers to Your Self-Publishing Questions About Copyrighting Your Ebook

First, you don’t really need a copyright page. Most of my ebooks don’t have one. What they DO have is a copyright line (footer). Mine are really simple. They usually say something like this (this is from Inkwell Editorial’s latest ebook, How to Find Ebook Writing Jobs):

How to Find Ebook Writing and Editing Jobs: 10 Free and Low-Cost Marketing Methods
©2012. Yuwanda Black. An http://InkwellEditorial.com publication.

A line similar to this appears on every page of all pdf versions of Inkwell Editorial’s ebooks. When you format them in other formats (eg, Amazon), there is no footer. But, the ebook is still copyright protected. Why/how?

Learn more about ebook theft and copyright protection (see section near end of post entitled, Why Isn’t Copyrighting on This List?)

What to Include on Your Ebook’s Copyright Page (If You Decide to Create One)

The bottom line is, your copyright page can be as simple or complicated as you want. At the very least, include the title, the year it was published, the author (and where applicable), the publishing company. That’s really all that’s necessary.

About Creating a Print Version of Your Ebook

If you go the do it yourself route (eg, CreateSpace), you have the same freedom as when you e-publish. So the same info (eg, copyright info) you put in your digital version will be what you’d create for your printed version. Again, that’s what’s so amazing about self-publishing – you don’t need to adhere to anyone’s guidelines.

And again, protecting your work (eg, copyrighting it) is done as soon as you create it as an original work.

About Adding Your Ebook to Different Sites (ie, Do You Need to Act as a “Publishing Company”)

No, you can publish as an individual.

Again, that’s what’s amazing about self-publishing in this day and age – it’s soooo simple.

About Needing an ISBN Number for Your Self-Published Ebook

You don’t need one. I’ve self-published over 50 ebooks, and publish on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Lulu and Clickbank. I’ve never used an ISBN number. It’s not necessary. These sites will assign you a publishing number (for free).

About Publishing Your Ebook Across Different Platforms (Eg, Kindle, Nook, iPhone, Etc.)

I’ve never done a printed ebook, so can’t tell you about using, for example, CreateSpace. But for ebooks, each site tends to have its own proprietary software. But with Barnes & Noble, for example, you can upload a pdf file.

Most of the software (eg, Amazon) is easy to use — if a bit tedious when it comes to formatting. But, that’s all part of the process.

Does Your Ebook Need a Logo?

Not sure what you mean by this, but if you’re talking about an ebook cover, yep, it should have one. It’s not NECESSARY though.

I published ebooks for years without covers. However, the trade has progressed to the point where potential buyers expect you to have one and it could hurt sales if you don’t.

I hope this info on self-publishing helps you on your ebook writing journey.

On a personal note . . .

I’m on the road here in Jamaica – going to my normal haunt – the mineral springs in the Blue Mountains. I’m also visiting the charming little parish known as Port Antonio for a few days.

Whenever I go to the springs with my friend and we pass through Port Antonio, I’m always amazed at how pretty it is. So finally, this time we decided to stay over for a few days so I could explore. I’ll be uploading some photos/video next week as I pick up the Girl a Go Go series again.

Best,
Yuwanda
how-to-write-an-ebook-medP.S.: Want to start your own “ebook publishing empire?” Think ebook publishing is hard? Have no idea how or where to start? Want to write an ebook but can never seem to make time to finish (or start)? You can! By next week this time, you could be finished writing your first ebook and be well on your way to getting your first sale. Really!

I know, I’ve published over 50 ebooks and since 2010, over half my annual income has come from e-products I write and promote. You can do the same thing.

P.P.S.: Problems Accessing the Free Ebook? A couple of people emailed me saying that the link to the free ebook doesn’t work. Following is my response on how to access it if you’ve had problems.

FYI, the link works. When you click thru to this page http://www.e-junkie.info/2012/11/publishing-your-first-ebook-free-ebook.html from my site, go to the bottom of the article where it says:

Free Download: “Publishing Your First eBook”

Once you click on that link, you’ll get a click out to an e-Junkie “payment” page. The ebook is free, hence you’ll see 0.00 in the “Amount” column. Just follow the procedures there as if you were paying, then you’ll be sent a download link once you finish the process.

Good luck accessing it; there’s some great info in there that’s really helpful if you’re looking to self-publish your first ebook.

Best,

Yuwanda

Read more.

How to Build a Six-Figure Freelance Business by Outsourcing (The Freelance Writer’s Outsource Package)

PREFACE

Like most of ebooks I write, this one was written because I receive a lot of questions from freelance writers about the subject matter; in this case, outsourcing….

Read more.

Building a Six-Figure Freelance Business – How to Locate, Interview & Hire Reliable Help

[See all Inkwell Editorial Work-from-Home Titles Here]

FOREWORD

This is an excerpt (a pullout) from the ebook, The Freelance Writer’s Outsource Package: How to Build a Six-Figure Freelance Business by Outsourcing. In this pullout, we focus on info on hire to hire reliable help, specifically:

x-click-but22Take your freelance business to the next level for only $14.95.

Part III: How to Hire Qualified Outsourcers;

PART IV: How to Determine What to Pay When You Outsource;

PART V: Non-Compete / Non-Disclosure & Independent Contractor’s Agreement; and

PART VI: 1099ing Freelancers

cover-lg-hiring-helpPREFACE

I’ve been a freelance writer since 1993 and receive questions from others about every aspect of freelance writing. It’s one of the reasons I started InkwellEditorial.com, a niche site about how to start a successful freelance writing career.

Why I Started to Receive Questions about Outsourcing

These really started in earnest when I started doing SEO writing. I wrote an ebook about my successful foray into this niche (How to Make $250+/Day Writing Simple, 500-Word Articles). In it, I detailed how I got so busy within the first couple of months that I had to outsource.

More questions came in, so I started a separate blog catering to this niche (SeoWritingJobs.com).

This signaled a couple of things to me: i) that many are not only finding success as freelance writers, they’re taking it to the next level and hiring others; and ii) there’s tons of work out there (especially for web/SEO writers) and many are finding it – and outsourcing it.

Hence, the need for info on outsourcing more than ever!

Questions about Outsourcing from Freelance Writers

Following is a detailed question that one freelancer sent in.

Yuwanda:

I have come to the realization that even when I’m swamped with work there is obviously only so much I can accomplish as an individual.

I would like to look into outsourcing my work. The main concern I have is how to have faith that a person will do the job with flying colors. I have placed a few craigslist ads . . . so I do have some people I’d like to try.

When you first went about hiring people to represent your hard work, did you draw up a contract with them? If so, what kind of issues do you feel is a MUST?

The last question I have is how to decide what kind of pay rate for the people I’d be outsourcing to? I can’t offer the moon & the stars right off the bat & I don’t want to lowball anyone.

Never Look for a Job Again!

This ebook will answer all of these questions and more, helping you to build a thriving freelance writing business that ensures you’ll never have to look for a job again – ever.

Following is the Table of Contents for the info covered in this pullout, Part II. See the full Table of Contents.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART III: HOW TO HIRE QUALIFIED OUTSOURCERS

Checklist of What to Look for In Freelancers You Outsource To

Freelance Writer’s Outsource Checklist

Why It’s Important to Trust Your Gut When Outsourcing

8 Outsourcing Tips I’ve Learned the Hard Way

How to Determine When to Pay Freelancers: Don’t Make This Mistake

How to Determine What Deadlines to Give Freelancers

Where to Advertise to Find Reliable Outsourcers

The Difference between Placing Ads on Freelance Writing Sites and on Sites like Craisglist

How to Write an Effective Freelance Job Ad

PART IV: HOW TO DETERMINE WHAT TO PAY WHEN YOU OUTSOURCE

Freelance Writers: How I Determine What to Pay Outsourcers I Contract With

Freelance Business Owners: Why You Shouldn’t Feel Guilty about What You Pay Other Freelance Writers

PART V: NON-COMPETE / NON-DISCLOSURE & INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR’S AGREEMENT

How to Handle Writing for Clients Who May Be Competitors

Confidentiality, Non-Compete & Work-for-Hire Agreement

PART VI: 1099ING FREELANCERS

What’s the Difference between an Employee and an Independent Contractor

How to Determine If You Need to Issue a 1099-MISC to a Freelancer

What a 1099 Looks Like

What a Filled Out 1099 Form Looks Like

Documents to Get from Freelancers to Properly Prepare 1099 Tax Forms

When to Send 1099s to Freelancers You’ve Used the Previous Tax Year

How to Find a Reputable Accountant

CONCLUSION

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

x-click-but22Take your freelance business to the next level for only $14.95.

Read more.

Building a Six-Figure Freelance Business – How to Meet and Beat Income Projections When Outsourcing

[See all Inkwell Editorial Work-from-Home Titles Here]

FOREWORD

This is an excerpt (a pullout) from the ebook, The Freelance Writer’s Outsource Package: How to Build a Six-Figure Freelance Business by Outsourcing.

x-click-but22Take your freelance business to the next level for only $14.95.

In this pullout, we focus on info from Part II if the main ebook, specifically How to Meet & Beat Income Projections When Outsourcing.

PREFACE

I’ve been a freelance writer since 1993 and receive questions from others about every aspect of freelance writing. It’s one of the reasons I started InkwellEditorial.com, a niche site about how to start a successful freelance writing career.

Why I Started to Receive Questions about Outsourcing

These really started in earnest when I started doing SEO writing. I wrote an ebook about my successful foray into this niche (How to Make $250+/Day Writing Simple, 500-Word Articles). In it, I detailed how I got so busy within the first couple of months that I had to outsource.

cover-lg-beatincome-projectionsMore questions came in, so I started a separate blog catering to this niche (SeoWritingJobs.com).

This signaled a couple of things to me: i) that many are not only finding success as freelance writers, they’re taking it to the next level and hiring others; and ii) there’s tons of work out there (especially for web/SEO writers) and many are finding it – and outsourcing it.

Hence, the need for info on outsourcing more than ever!

Questions about Outsourcing from Freelance Writers

Following is a detailed question that one freelancer sent in that really prompted me to write this ebook.

Yuwanda:

I have come to the realization that even when I’m swamped with work there is obviously only so much I can accomplish as an individual.

I would like to look into outsourcing my work. The main concern I have is how to have faith that a person will do the job with flying colors. I have placed a few craigslist ads . . . so I do have some people I’d like to try.

When you first went about hiring people to represent your hard work, did you draw up a contract with them? If so, what kind of issues do you feel is a MUST?

The last question I have is how to decide what kind of pay rate for the people I’d be outsourcing to? I can’t offer the moon & the stars right off the bat & I don’t want to lowball anyone.

Never Look for a Job Again!

This ebook will answer all of these questions and more, helping you to build a thriving freelance writing business that ensures you’ll never have to look for a job again – ever.

Following is the Table of Contents for the info covered in this pullout, Part II. See the full Table of Contents.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART II: HOW TO MEET & BEAT INCOME PROJECTIONS WHEN OUTSOURCING

How to Create a Marketing Plan to Meet Your Income Projections

Sample Marketing Schedule that Can Get You to $100K/Year

Tips for Creating an Effective Marketing Plan/Schedule

Freelance Writing Marketing Calendar

Monthly Marketing Tip

Where to Find Prospects to Contact

Marketing Plan Success: One Freelance Writer’s Story – On the Way to $100K in Less Than a Year

Earning Six Figures in a Year: The Key?

One Thing to Do Before You Start to Outsource

Other Things You Might Want to Outsource

CONCLUSION

The Importance of Consistent Marketing: What a Business Mentor Taught Me

One Final Word

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

x-click-but22Take your freelance business to the next level for only $14.95.

Read more.

Freelance Writing Advice: Why I Tend to Earn More When I Travel (and Work Less) – and You Can Too!

As you’re reading this, I’m on a plane on my way to Jamaica. I’ll be gone for a month. One of the things I love about being a freelance writer (web entrepreneur) is that my income doesn’t stop because I hop on a plane.

In fact, one of my sisters – who travels a lot as well – pointed out that we tend to earn more when we’re travelling than when we’re at home. I don’t know if this is exactly true as I haven’t crunched the numbers and compared them to find out, but one thing I can say is that my earnings are consistent – whether I’m travelling or at home. This is not by accident.

Freelance Writers: 4 Ways to Keep Your Earnings Consistent When You Travel

Freelance Writers: How to Have Fun -- and Still Make Money -- While on the RoadI work while travelling for the most part, but it can be very sporadic compared to when I’m at home. But again, my earnings are consistent. With the holidays upon us, it’s a time when many are travelling. So I thought I’d share some of the things I do that help me to keep my earnings stay consistent when I’m on the road – and you can too.

I. Identify your income streams: The reason it’s important to do this is to hone in on how you make your money so you can consistently do the marketing tasks that support each income stream while you’re on the road.

For example, I have four income streams. They are: (i) ebook sales, (ii) freelance writing projects from clients via my SEO writing company, (iii) internet marketing and (iv) freelance writing seminars/classes. My main marketing outlets are article marketing, publishing newsletters, placing free ads on sites like backpage and Craigislist; using social media (eg, tweeting) and blogging.

This brings me to the second tip, which is to . . .

II. Automate your marketing tasks where possible: Of the above tasks, the ones that I can automate are blogging, tweeting and publishing newsletters. And that’s exactly what I’ve done. For example, I’ve scheduled tweets for the rest of this week.

Although I will be working again as early as Wednesday, it’s not going to be a full day. In fact, I know that this entire week is probably “shot” as far work goes because once I get to Jamaica, the first few days I’m going to be going out, catching up with friends, going to the beach, etc. So that’s why I went ahead and scheduled a week’s worth of tweets (using SocialOomph.com) and wrote and pre-scheduled this week’s newsletters to go out (two of them).

This way, even though I’ll be working partial days, my main marketing tasks still get done.

III. Create a travel work schedule: As soon as you can, when you get to your destination, get into a normal work routine. While I’d love to chuck my laptop the rest of this week, I can’t. So my plan is to work at least four hours per day for the rest of this week, then start putting in 5-6 hours per day (M-F) for the rest of the time I’m here in Jamaica.

This brings me to my final tip, which is to . . .

IV. Plan to work less: When I’m home, I put in a lot more than 5-6 hours per day. But, I’m here in Jamaica to not only have some fun (hence the lighter work load), but to also train for and run the Reggae Marathon in December, in addition to checking out hotels for the SEO writing class next April. I’ll also be taking some day trips, eg, my normal trek to the mineral springs up in the Blue Mountains in Jamaica.

With so much going on, I’m not even going to try to work like I work at home. If you plan to work less while you’re on the road, you’ll immediately feel less stressed because you won’t feel the pressure of NOT being able to put in all the hours you normally do.

Freelance Writers: One of the Biggest Benefits of Working Less While Travelling

Another benefit I’ve found to planning to work less is that I tend to be much more focused when I sit down to work. It’s because I focus on what absolutely, positively has to get done – blocking out everything else (eg, surfing, paying bills online, playing around on social media, etc.).

Learn more about finances, freelancing and travelling – and how to do it successfully. Hope this insight helps, and that you embrace and enjoy the flexibility of being a freelance writer. And happy trails – wherever your travels take you this holiday season.

For my American friends, don’t forget to vote today if you haven’t done so already!

Yuwanda
Find this post informative? Please RT It and Follow Inkwell Editorial on Twitter.
coverP.S.: Get the freelance writing opportunity that allowed me to be financially secure enough to travel, live abroad, get out of debt and really “live the freelance life!”

P.P.S.: Want to start a successful career where you have the mobility to live and work where you please? Visit our freelance writing bookstore for a ton of opportunities (freelance writing and internet marketing) to get you started.

Read more.

Writing Ebooks: Questions about Self-Publishing from New/Aspiring Authors

Following are a few questions from readers of this blog about writing ebooks that have been sitting in my inbox that I’ve been meaning to get to….

Read more.